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CORAL IS CRITICAL

As the effects of climate change are felt on the Earth, the tragedy ahead is calling out to a new generation of heroes. Will you be one of them?

For decades, campaigns and initiatives to protect and re-plant our forests have been active across the globe. The role of trees in a healthy atmosphere is one of primary importance. From large scale efforts to tree planting campaigns by individuals, our forests and our air are being protected and renewed.

But what about our oceans? 71% of our globe is covered by water and our lives depend upon its health. So, what are we doing to protect and renew our oceans?

Blue Ocean Watch, with support from sponsors, is on the frontlines of protecting, planting and propagating one of the most critical elements to healthy oceans:

CORAL

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Climate change is putting coral’s future in danger along with the millions of species that inhabit the reefs and the half a billion people who rely on reef fish for food.

The warming of the ocean has led to coral bleaching and the destruction coral habitats all across the planet.

It is estimated that without significant action,
90% of reefs will be dead by 2050.

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SO, CORAL CLEARLY MATTERS TO OUR OCEANS BUT WHY SHOULD IT MATTER TO YOU?

• Corals cover less than 1% of the ocean’s floors, however, our fisheries depend on the reefs for 25-40% of the catch globally. Coral reefs are places for fish to breed, feed, grow, and live.

• The commercial value of U.S. fisheries from coral reefs is over $100 million (NMFS/NOAA, 2001). In addition, the annual value of reef-dependent recreational fisheries probably exceeds $100 million per year. In developing countries, coral reefs contribute about one-quarter of the total fish catch, providing critical food resources for tens of millions of people (Jameson et al., 1995).

•  In the protective environment of most corals lives a symbiotic algae that has all the compounds necessary for photosynthesis. The algae produce carbohydrates (sugars) that go to the coral, and also produce oxygen.
And, long time storage of carbon is present in coral reefs.


• Coral reefs absorb an average of 97 percent of wave energy and therefore naturally protect coasts from storms and tropical cyclones by reducing the impact of large waves before they reach the shore. To put it simply, coral reefs save lives.

And then there’s tourism.
Every year, eco-tourists spend over $30 billion in tourism dollars visiting coral reefs and the communities that surround them.

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By partnering with local and regional experts, BOW is able to efficiently and effectively support and advance coral regeneration, replantation and coral recovery.  

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Our efforts support local efforts while implementing cutting edge technology and global expertise.